Wednesday, May 15: Welcome and Introductions

 

9:30–10:00

Coffee and registration

10:00–10:15

Welcome

Irma Erlingsdóttir, Director of EDDA

10.15-10.30

Course outline

Thomas Brorsen Smidt, coordinator

10.30-11.30

Student Introduction Round

11.30–12:30

Lunch

12.30-13.00

Practical Information + Q&A

Thomas Brorsen Smidt, coordinator

13.00-??.??

Afternoon Event / TBA

 

 

Thursday, May 16: Intersectionality

Lecturer: Christopher Collstedt

8:30–10:00

Lecture:  Intersectionality in a Nordic Context. On the Shifting Meanings, Practices and Controversies Around a ‘Traveling Concept’

11:00–12:30

Group discussion:

Topic: Retrospective Critiques on Intersectionality

 

Based on your readings and interpretations of the provided texts (see reading list below), discuss the critiques presented on the different meanings and uses of the concept of intersectionality. The following questions might serve as starting points:

 

·         Starting from your readings of Kimberly Crenshaws seminal article ‘Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex’ (1989), discuss her epistemological, methodological and political arguments for developing and using the concept of intersectionality.

·         Since the late 1980s, i.e., the concept of intersectionality has moved from being firmly situated within American black feminist thought and critical race theory to becoming a most central term, frequently used in various European scientific contexts and discourses. Discuss the epistemological, methodological and political implications of this ‘travel’? 

·         As a concept, intersectionality has been alternatively celebrated and critiqued. On what grounds? Reflect on the authors´ different views on the concept´s epistemological and methodological ‘weaknesses’ and ‘strengths’, particularly when used in gender research.

·         What is the status of intersectionality today, and what might the epistemological and methodological challenges for future research on intersectionality be?

 

Based on your discussions around the ‘travels’ of intersectionality as a theoretical and methodological concept, each group is expected to formulate two questions for the plenary discussion on the main topic: Future Challenges for the Research on Intersectionality

11.30-13.30

Lunch + break

13.30-15.00

Paper presentation

Selected papers on intersectionality

 

Lecturer provides feedback, facilitates discussion

15:00–16:30

Plenary discussion and concluding remarks  

Main topic: Future Challenges for Nordic Research on Intersectionality.

 

Each group will start by giving a short summary of their discussions and by presenting two questions for the plenary discussion. The introductory remarks should be around 8-10 minutes. When all groups have made their introductory remarks, a joint discussion around the presented questions in relation to the main topic will follow.  

Readings

Brah, Avtar and Phoenix, Ann, “Ain´t I A Woman? Revisiting Intersectionality” in Journal of International Women´s Studies, 2004, Vol 5 Issue 3.

Crenshaw, Kimberly, ”Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics,” in University of Chicago Legal Forum: Vol. 1989: Iss. 1, Article 8.

Carbin, Maria and Edenheim, Sara,”The Intersectional Turn in Feminist Theory: A Dream of a Common Language? In European Journal of Women´s Studies, 2013, Vol 20(3).

Davis, Kathy and Zarkov, Dubravka, ”EJWS Retrospective on Intersectionality” in European Journal of Women´s Studies, 2017, Vol 24(4).

Salem, Sara, ”Intersectionality and Its Discontents: Intersectionality as a Traveling Theory” in European Journal of Women´s Studies, 2018, Vol 25(4).

 

 

Friday, May 17: Gender, Labour and Migration

Lecturer: Anna Karlsdottir

8:30–10:00

Lecture: State of the NORDIC REGION – MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION

11:00–12:30

Group discussion:

Topic: Approaches to labour market integration – Nordic differences

Based on your readings and interpretations of the provided texts (see reading list below), discuss the critiques presented on the different meanings and uses of the concept of intersectionality. The following questions might serve as starting points:

 

·         Starting from your readings of State of the Nordic region – integration and immigration edition, we may discuss commonalities and differences in policies towards immigrants in the Nordic countries. Understanding different ways of measuring and evaluating policy interventions and its effects.

·         World value survey as an approach to understand different values to integration among asylum seekers, refugees and immigrant groups of Non-European origin and gendered implications in the Nordic countries

·         The numerous studies findings that gender roles and preconditions in transiting to self-sustaining employees or employers in the Nordic countries. …What can we learn from myriads of actions initiated to facilitate labour market participation and how they affect the genders differently?

·         Three different case studies from Finland, Iceland and Sweden give us insights into immigrant women´s experience with entering labour market in a case studies based approach – in which way are they explanatory for gender studies from the immigrant perspective?

11.30-13.30

Lunch + break

13.30-1500

Paper presentation

Selected papers on immigration, labour and gender

 

Lecturer provides feedback, facilitates discussion

15:00–16:30

Plenary discussion and concluding remarks  

Main topic: Future Challenges for Nordic Research Migration, labour and Gender

 

Each group will start by giving a short summary of their discussions and by presenting two questions for the plenary discussion. The introductory remarks should be around 8-10 minutes. When all groups have made their introductory remarks, a joint discussion around the presented questions in relation to the main topic will follow.  

Readings

Karlsdóttir, A, Rispling, L, Norén, G & Randall, L;(Eds). (2018) State of the Nordic Region 2018 – Immigration and Integration Edition. Copenhagen: Nordic Council of Ministers.

 

Karlsdóttir, A., Sigurjónsdóttir, H.R., Ström Hildestrand, Å., & Cuadrado, A. (2017). Policies and measures for speeding up labour market integration of refugees in the Nordic Region – A knowledge overview (Nordregio working paper 2018). Stockholm: Nordregio.

 

Nouris, P., & Puranen. B. (2019). Migrant Hygge: Feeling at home in a cold climate. 1-34, Institutet för framtidsstudier. Stockholm. Iffs.se

 

Sigurjónsdóttir, H.R., & Vøien, M., & Meckl, M. (2018). Enhanced Labour Market Opportunities for Immigrant Women – case studies from Arctic cities. NORDREGIO REPORT 2018:3

 

 

Saturday, May 18: Queer History and Theory

Lecturer: Íris Ellenberger

8:30–9:10

Lecture: Queer before queer in the 18th and 19th century

9:20–10:00

Working groups: Assignments and discussions based on the lecture and Holmqvist’s and Hellesund’s text

10:20–11:00

Lecture: Homosexuality on the horizon in the 1950s

11:10–11:50

Working groups: Discussions and assignments Based on the lecture and Juvonen’s text

11.50-13.30

Lunch + break

13:30–14:10

Lecture: Queer Nation in the 21st century

14:20–15:00

Working groups: Assignments based on the lecture and Petersen’s et. al. text.

15:15–16:30

Student presentations

 

Sunday, May 19: Student’s Day Off

Lecturer: None.

TBA

TBA

 

Monday, May 20: Race, Post-Colonialism and Whiteness

Lecturers: Diana Mulinari and Rikke Andreassen

8:30–10:00

Lecture: Diana Mulinari: Race and postcolonialism

11:00–12:30

Lecture: Rikke Andreassen: Nordic whiteness

 12.30-13.30

Lunch + break

13:30–15:00

Students divided into groups; each group focuses on a particular theme (race, gender, media, politics, sexuality). Each student chooses a group/theme that fits her/his/their dissertation topic the best.

In the groups, the students write / produce text or analysis for their dissertations based on the new knowledge they have gained over the previous days, and related to their group’s specific theme

15:00–16:30

We provide feedback to each one group – one at a time, while the other groups discuss and produce texts.  

Readings ON Race and Postcolonialism

Bilge, S (2013) Intersectionality Undone. Saving Intersectionality from Feminist Intersectionality Studies. 10. (2) 405-424.

 

Collins, H. P (2013) Truth telling and Intellectual Activism. Context.  https://journals-sagepub-com.ludwig.lub.lu.se/doi/10.11.

 

Lewis, G (2013) ‘Unsafe Travel: Experiencing Intersectionality and Feminist Displacements’ Signs: a journal of women and culture. Vol. 38, No. 4, Intersectionality: Theorizing Power, Empowering Theory (Summer 2013), pp. 869-892

 

Lugones, M. (2010) Toward a Decolonial Feminism. Hypatia. Vol. 25, No. 4 (FALL 2010), pp. 742-759

Mohanty, Ch (2013) “Transnational Feminist Crossings: On Neoliberalism and Radical Critique,” Signs, A Journal of Women, Culture and Society, Vol. 38, No .4, pp 967-991.  

Tomlinson, B (2013) To tell the truth and not get trapped: Desire, distance, and intersectionality at the scene of argument. Signs 38(4): 993–1018.

Readings on Nordic Whiteness

Keskinen & Andreassen (2017). Developing Theoretical Perspectives On Racialisation and Migration. Nordic Journal of Migration Research, Volume 7: Issue 2, pp. 64–69

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1515/njmr-2017-0018

 

Andreassen & Ahmed (2014). I can never be normal: A conversation about race, daily life practices, food and power. European Journal of Women’s Studies (21(1), pp. 25-42

Doi: 10.1177/1350506813507716

 

Andreassen & Myong (2017). Race, Gender, and Reseacher Positionality Analysed Through Memory Work. Nordic Journal of Migration Research, Volume 7: Issue 2, pp. 97-104.

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1515/njmr-2017-0011

 

Andreassen (2017). Social Imaginaries, Sperm and Whiteness: Race and Reproduction in British Media, Journal of Intercultural Studies, 38:2, 123-138, Doi: 10.1080/07256868.2017.1289906

 

Tuesday, May 21: Race, Post-Colonialism and Whiteness (Continued)

8:30–9:00

Welcome to the final day; group formations (according to dissertations and wishes). 

9.00-12.00

Production of texts and analysis (based on the PhD course) individually or in groups

 12.00-13.00

Lunch + break (Mulinari and Andreassen read potential new texts).

13:00–15:30

Feedback sessions: Mulinari and Andreassen provide feedback to individual students or groups of students on the production / new texts / new analysis.

15:30–16:30

Final comments and round up.